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Hello readers. Sorry I haven’t posted since Friday. It’s midterm season and I’m pretty busy with a marketing campaign. Have a picture.

I recently saw this clever print advertisement for a Monster.com-equivalent called Career Junction Middle East.  It really catches the eye and fits well with the company’s service message, I think.
Found on Digg.  Dugg.

Found on Digg. Dugg.

“Put your skills to better use.”  Well done.

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Found on Digg; originally on Matthew Kendig's Flickr photostream.

Found on Digg; originally on Matthew Kendig's Flickr photostream. Dugg.

“Please tip; we are trying to raise $700 billion to help rich folks.”

ChunkIt!, a search engine tool created by the company I’m interning for, was featured this year in an article called “11 Things You Shouldn’t Leave For School Without”.  The article was posted on Dumb Little Man, which is kind of like LifeHacker in that it teaches you tips for making your life easier.

The article’s 10 little-known but highly recommended websites for students includes OttoBib, an automatic bibliography creator tool; eFax, which allows you to recieve faxes as email attachments in your inbox; and Qipit, which allows you easily to turn cameraphone photos of your school notes into documents.

Of course, the website I was most excited about seeing in the article was getchunkit.com:

”Instead of clicking from link to link, this add-on is able to mine every link on a web page and pulls out the information for you. Makes researching 10x faster.”‘

Dumb Little Man about ChunkIt!

“11 Things You Shouldn’t Leave for School Without” was featured on Propeller this week, and has something like 1500 diggs on Digg.  If you’re a student, check it out and bookmark it; it has lots of helpful suggestions.

The New York Times did an interesting visual piece earlier this month showing which words were used most frequently by Republicans versus Democrats at their respective national conventions.  I think it succinctly demonstrates which issues each party is focusing voters’ attention on, and it’s an interesting study in rhetoric as well.

//www.nytimes.com/interactive/2008/09/04/us/politics/20080905_WORDS_GRAPHIC.html.Results are surprising: Despite what Jon Stewart would have you believe, Rudy Giuliani only mentioned September 11th once.

For a larger image, go to the original New York Times article.  I must also give credit to Digg for featuring this article a few weeks back.  Dugg.

I found these on Digg.  Dugg.

I found these on Digg. Dugg.